Brake System & Anti-Lock Brakes2019-01-12T09:34:41+00:00

Brake System

Disc brakes consist of five things:

Brake discs (or rotors)

Calipers

Brake pads

Brake lines

Brake master cylinder

A disc brake has a plate-like disc called a rotor attached to the wheel. This plate is squeezed by the brake pads in between the caliper. This pressure slows your car down.

New and Old Brake Rotors

This image shows a new rotor compared to an old one

The brake pads consist of two layers: a metal backing plate and a high-friction material that does the work by pressing against the brake disc or rotor. In addition to serving as a “platform” for the friction material, the backing plate will also protect the caliper from excessive heat buildup.

Murrieta Mobile Mechanic Brake Pads

In this image we have two brake pads, on the top is a new one. On the bottom is the old one showing rust and wear.

Change your brake fluid

Brake fluid is hydroscopic, meaning it will attract moisture. This can be bad for several reasons:

Moisture in the brake fluid will reduce its boiling point; this makes it easier for the fluid to boil under heavy braking.

Boiling brake fluid can cause brake fade when driving down long mountain roads, especially with a heavy load or while towing a trailer.

Moisture acts to corrode metal components within the braking system, possibly causing an eventual failure.

Fortunately, the solution is easy. Brake fluid should be changed on the service interval recommended by your vehicle’s manufacturer, or around every two years or so.

Anti-Lock Brakes

The anti-lock brake system’s speed sensors are used to predict how quickly your vehicle is moving; over time, the sensors can become misaligned. Depending on the model, make, and year of your vehicle, calibration of the ABS will most likely require an experienced  brake service specialists like Murrieta Mobile Mechanic to access the computer system and drive the vehicle at various speeds to reset and calibrate the speed sensors. It is best to have the ABS speed sensors calibrated about  once a year, or at least every time you have your brake service performed.